Monday, October 30, 2006

Every drop of blood drawn with the lash

I'm continuing my series that will look at the importance of black theology in our American Christian lives. Rebecca, you should know that this series will finally explain why I reference James Cone as though he is someone who ought to be listened to. :)

Today's column is a look at the history of slavery and how white Americans relate to that history.

12 comments:

carrie said...

Hi Julie...

Wanted you to know I'm reading along. I don't have any comments right now, but am looking forward to reading the future columns. I'm trying to be in listening mode instead of reply mode. ;-) Always good practice for little ol' opinionated me!

BTW- Have you seen trailers or info on the movie the Color of the Cross? It looks very interesting. www.colorofthecross.com

julieunplugged said...

That's what this week's column is actually about, isn't it? Listening first. That's just what I'm trying to do and in fact, this week's column and the ones up-coming are about what I've heard when I've listened to this other way of living faith.

Thanks for responding.

I haven't seen that movie promoted. I'll go look into it.

Julie

Kansas Bob said...

All I can say is wow. Julie, you have captured this story in a way that I have never thought of. I'm guessing that is why you are writing it - for people like me. Great Job! Look forward to reading more.

Anonymous said...

I really enjoyed the writing of this piece, even if the topic is challenging to read about. Thank you for taking this on.

SusansPlace said...

Powerful piece, Julie. Almost too painful to think about, read about, ponder but I will. It's necessary to understand the dark side of history along with the bright side.

Susan

Matt said...

Julie, fantastic column -- it's a part of our national history that has been swept under the rug far too often, but a part that we must continue to remember and reflect upon every day, in dealings with those in our nation as well as our actions in response to the treatment of others around the world. I'm going to link it to my blog for others to read.....

- Matt

Bilbo said...

Hi Julie,

Nice piece of work. I read a book a couple of years ago called Divided by Faith: Evangelcal Religion and the Problem of Race. I really, really, liked the book and if or when you get time you might want to check it out...Bill

julieunplugged said...

Bilbo, do you have an author?

Matt, thank you.

Thanks to all of you. This is one of those topics that changed my life so I look forward to putting it into some kind of coherence to share.

Julie

julieunplugged said...

Btw, the title of the column was not mine. My editor drew it from Lincoln's second inaugural address which is linked from the column itself.

Julie

Chuck said...

We heard James Cone speak on Sunday morning in Dayton. His sermon focused on the correlations between the cross and the lynching tree. One of his three texts was the lyrics of Strange Fruit, a song performed by Billie Holliday in the late 1930s.

The sermon was truth-telling at it's best. He referred to bestowing "eschatological meaning" upon the lynching deaths as a part of redemption. Although he only mentioned Bonhoeffer in passing, I'm assuming he expands upon the commonalities between the Afro-American and Jewish holocausts in his other writings.

Bilbo said...

Hi Julie,

Sorry for forgetting the authors. The book is co-authored by Michael O.Emerson and Christian Smith. They are both sociology profs at Rice and the University of North Carolina, repectively...

sadiq.jimeta said...

Julie:

You are tackling some very controversial issues on your blog -interesting stuff.

While you address a painful and neglected part of history, I hope you will make pointer to the fact that there shouldn't be black theology. There should be God's word and intent taught to believers around the world. It should neither have an American flavor nor a British flavor but should have the flavor of the early church in the Book of Acts (a painful reality for very many American believers).

God is sovereign and rules over the affairs of men. He is reconfiguring the make up (and was there in the midst of slavery-how would you explain a man like Frederick Douglas grasping the essence of Christ, while his master (Covey) used that same bible to justify his enslavement)of nations and uses the actions of men to accomplish his purpose. The custodians of God's word have changed from time to time (if you study history) and many times they don't seem to execute justice fairly. I believe God is just revealing the flaws and injustices of the custodians over time. Thus US being the custodian of God's word for the past hundreds of years has executed a lot of injustice and you are bringing it to the fore.

When God moves again, the new custodians must be sure not to make the mistakes of those in the past.